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In the Media

I'm delighted to see my book The People of the Indus being received so positively in the media. Here is the media coverage the book has received so far.



A new graphic novel offers a deep dive into the Indus Valley Civilisation that children will enjoy

Rati Girish writes for Scroll.in:


"Through an informal, almost conversational narrative, and detailed black-and-white illustrations, we are introduced to the various facets of life in 2600 BCE. We learn about why families migrated from one place to another, how they built their houses, the famous drainage system, the professions of that time, and why the Indus civilisation differed vastly from other ancient civilisations."






Avantika Shankar writes in The Hindu:


"The book is educational in intent, but not in the way that mainstream Indian audiences are used to. Facts aren't stated, they're suggested. Theories are offered, considered, and even contradicted. Academic discoveries aren't presented as the finish line; they're the starting point of an investigation into the recesses of human history. For readers who expect the didacticity of a conventional school textbook, the inscription from Le Guin is a redirection: 'History is not a science, it is an art.'"







Sahana Iyer writes for The New Indian Express:


"Apart from the friendly escort, it is the picture-only sections that I found mesmerising. As if looking at a movie storyboard, the no-speech panels manage to share information and tell a story with no interruption from words. That being said, the novel also hosts panels that are rich in information. I found myself engrossed in the unique seals (that acted like the signatures of today), the decentralised power and the conversation on language...


The book took me back to days of reading Amar Chitra Katha and the experience is just as enchanting as I remember it."






Omar Khan writes for Harappa.com:


"Once in a while a book – in this case, surprisingly, a graphic novel – comes along that upends what one thinks can be done through a medium for a subject. The People of the Indus by Nikhil Gulati – with the expert assistance of Dr. Jonathan Mark Kenoyer – is one of the moments. None too soon either, given the misinformation and general lack of truly accessible, fun medium with which to reach wider audiences with the facts and mysteries of the ancient Indus."



The book is available for purchase in bookstores all over India and online on Amazon.

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